Evaluation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time mixing studies using an estimated factor correction method

Jian Chen, Bonnie Phillips, Wayne L. Chandler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mixing studies for prolonged prothrombin time (PT)/ activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) are used to estimate whether the prolongation is due to an inhibitor or factor deficiency. We propose a new method of mixing study interpretation based on estimation of average factor level changes. Factor level vs. PT/aPTT curves were prepared for single factor, vitamin K-dependent factor, and all factor deficiencies. These curves were used to predict the factor level in the sample and the correction needed to differentiate deficiencies from inhibitors. We compared this estimated factor correction (EFC) method to normal range, percentage correction, and Rosner index. For a given factor level, multiple factor deficiencies prolonged the PT/aPTT more than single factor deficiency, necessitating different thresholds for defining correction on mixing studies. The EFC method was superior to other the correction methods, correctly identifying 38 of 39 known inhibitors, single and multiple factor deficiencies, and correctly identifying inhibitor vs. deficiency in 50 of 59 patient samples. In 99 adult patient mixing studies over 18 months, 30% showed deficiency only, 30% inhibitor only, whereas 40% showed evidence of both. The EFC method for PT/aPTT mixing study interpretation was more accurate than the comparison methods at determining deficiency versus inhibitor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-96
Number of pages7
JournalBlood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Activated partial thromboplastin time
  • Lupus anticoagulant
  • Mixing studies
  • Prothrombin time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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