Epstein–Barr Virus–Associated B-Cell Proliferations of Diverse Clonal Origins after Bone Marrow Transplantation in a 12-Year-Old Patient with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

William T. Shearer, Jerome Ritz, Milton J. Finegold, I. Celine Guerra, Howard M. Rosenblatt, Dorothy E. Lewis, Marilyn S. Pollack, Larry H. Taber, Ciro V. Sumaya, F. Carl Grumet, Michael L. Cleary, Roger Warnke, Jeffrey Sklar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

147 Scopus citations

Abstract

The appearance of unregulated B-lymphocyte proliferations in organ-transplant recipients is a recent observation that has produced new concerns about the role of immunosuppressive agents and viruses in the development of neoplasia.1 In particular, the detection of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) or its genome in hyperplastic lymph nodes or in lymphoma-like growths in immunosuppressed transplant recipients suggests that the virus is a causative agent of the unregulated B-lymphocyte growth.2 The controversy regarding the nature of these growths — i.e., whether they are neoplastic or hyperplastic — was recently studied in cardiac-allograft recipients by application of DNA-hybridization techniques. That analysis showed that lymphoproliferative.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1151-1159
Number of pages9
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume312
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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