Eniluracil plus 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin: Treatment for metastatic breast cancer patients in whom capecitabine treatment rapidly failed

Edgardo Rivera, Jenny C. Chang, Vladimir Semiglazov, Olga Burdaeva, M. Gray Kirby, Thomas Spector

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background As part of a comparative phase II study of eniluracil/5-FU/Lv vs. capecitabine (Xeloda), an oral 5-FU prodrug for MBC, patients with rapid PD during capecitabine therapy crossed over to take eniluracil/5-FU/Lv. Patients and Methods Ten evaluable patients with radiologically documented PD within 70 days of capecitabine treatment were treated with a modified oral weekly eniluracil/5-FU/Lv regimen. Results After switching to eniluracil/5-FU/Lv, 3 (30%) patients had PR. Six (60%) had SD, producing a total of 90% with PR or SD. The median PFS was 140 days (vs. 42.5 days for capecitabine). Four (40%) patients had > 7months PFS. Eniluracil/5-FU/Lv was well tolerated with mild to moderate diarrhea and nausea as the most common side effects. Conclusion These positive efficacy and safety results encourage a larger study in patients with rapid PD during capecitabine treatment. Eniluracil/5-FU/Lv might enable these patients to continue with oral 5-FU rather than switching to the generally less well tolerated intravenous microtubule-interfering agents. In addition, the eniluracil/5-FU/Lv regimen might also provide any overall survival contribution of 5-FU that, for pharmacokinetic reasons, was not provided by capecitabine and would not be provided if these patients progressed directly to the other approved treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-30
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Breast Cancer
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

Keywords

  • 5-ethynyluracil
  • 776C85
  • Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase
  • DPD
  • Xeloda

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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