Emerging local immunomodulatory strategies to circumvent systemic immunosuppression in cell transplantation

Jocelyn Nikita Campa-Carranza, Jesus Paez-Mayorga, Corrine Ying Xuan Chua, Joan Nichols, Alessandro Grattoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Cell transplantation is a promising curative therapeutic strategy whereby impaired organ function can be restored without the need for whole-organ transplantation. A key challenge in allotransplantation is the requirement for life-long systemic immunosuppression to prevent rejection, which is associated with serious adverse effects such as increased risk of opportunistic infections and the development of neoplasms. This challenge underscores the urgent need for novel strategies to prevent graft rejection while abrogating toxicity-associated adverse events. Areas covered: We review recent advances in immunoengineering strategies for localized immunomodulation that aim to support allograft function and provide immune tolerance in a safe and effective manner. Expert opinion: Immunoengineering strategies are tailored approaches for achieving immunomodulation of the transplant microenvironment. Biomaterials can be adapted for localized and controlled release of immunomodulatory agents, decreasing the effective dose threshold and frequency of administration. The future of transplant rejection management lies in the shift from systemic to local immunomodulation with suppression of effector and activation of regulatory T cells, to promote immune tolerance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Delivery
Early online dateMay 29 2022
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - May 29 2022

Keywords

  • cell therapy
  • immunomodulation
  • Local immunosuppression
  • long-acting drug delivery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Emerging local immunomodulatory strategies to circumvent systemic immunosuppression in cell transplantation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this