Electrospun electroconductive constructs of aligned fibers for cardiac tissue engineering

Chiara Mancino, Troy Hendrickson, Lauren V. Whitney, Francesca Paradiso, Sara Abasi, Ennio Tasciotti, Francesca Taraballi, Anthony Guiseppi-Elie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Myocardial infarction remains the leading cause of death in the western world. Since the heart has limited regenerative capabilities, several cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) strategies have been proposed to repair the damaged myocardium. A novel electrospun construct with aligned and electroconductive fibers combining gelatin, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid and polypyrrole that may serve as a cardiac patch is presented. Constructs were characterized for fiber alignment, surface wettability, shrinkage and swelling behavior, porosity, degradation rate, mechanical properties, and electrical properties. Cell-biomaterial interactions were studied using three different types of cells, Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes (NRVM), human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). All cell types showed good viability and unique organization on construct surfaces depending on their phenotype. Finally, we assessed the maturation status of NRVMs after 14 days by confocal images and qRT-PCR. Overall evidence supports a proof-of-concept that this novel biomaterial construct could be a good candidate patch for CTE applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102567
Pages (from-to)102567
JournalNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
Volume44
Early online dateMay 18 2022
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Biomimetic scaffold
  • Cardiac tissue engineering
  • Electroconductivity
  • Electrospinning
  • Maturation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Pharmaceutical Science

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