Efficacy Outcomes of Brolucizumab Versus Aflibercept in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration Patients with Early Residual Fluid

Rishi P. Singh, Chirag Jhaveri, Charles C. Wykoff, Richard P. Gale, Giovanni Staurenghi, Tomohiro Iida, Adrian Koh, Guruprasad B, Kinfemichael Gedif, Michael Singer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To compare the outcomes of brolucizumab versus aflibercept in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration with early residual fluid in the HAWK and HARRIER studies. Design: Post hoc analysis using pooled data from the phase 3 studies HAWK (NCT02307682) and HARRIER (NCT02434328). Participants: The early residual fluid cohort for this post hoc analysis consisted of patients treated with either brolucizumab 6 mg (n = 730 patients) or aflibercept 2 mg (n = 729 patients) and who had the presence of intraretinal fluid (IRF), subretinal fluid (SRF), or both verified by spectral-domain OCT at the week 12 clinic visit. Methods: After 3 initial monthly doses, patients treated with brolucizumab received injections every 12 weeks (q12w) or every 8 weeks (q8w), depending on the neovascular age-related macular degeneration disease activity, whereas patients treated with aflibercept received fixed q8w dosing. Main Outcome Measures: The mean change in best-corrected visual acuity and central subfield thickness (CST) from the baseline to that at weeks 48 and 96, the proportion of patients treated with brolucizumab remaining on q12w dosing to week 96, and the change in fluid status at weeks 48 and 96. Results: All analyses were based on 149 of 730 (20.4%) patients treated with brolucizumab and 217 of 729 (29.8%) patients treated with aflibercept with spectral-domain OCT–verified IRF, SRF, or both at their week 12 visit. The best-corrected visual acuity improvements from baseline at weeks 48 and 96 were numerically better for brolucizumab than for aflibercept (least square mean [standard error] 7.9 ± 1.1 vs. 4.6 ± 0.9 and 7.4 ± 1.3 vs. 2.9 ± 1.1 letters, respectively). The CST reductions from baseline at weeks 48 and 96 were consistently greater with brolucizumab than with aflibercept (least square mean [standard error], μm: −194.9 ± 13.7 vs. −123.9 ± 11.3; and −201.1 ± 14.5 vs. −134.2 ± 12.0, respectively). At weeks 48 and 96, patients treated with brolucizumab had a 40.4% and 31.3% probability of remaining on q12w dosing intervals, respectively. Fewer patients treated with brolucizumab had remaining IRF, SRF, or both at weeks 48 and 96 than patients treated with aflibercept (59.1% vs. 75.1% and 49.0% vs. 60.4%, respectively). Conclusions: In patients with early residual fluid, defined as spectral-domain OCT–verified IRF, SRF, or both at the week 12 clinic visit, brolucizumab resolved the early residual fluid and reduced CST more effectively than aflibercept, resulting in greater best-corrected visual acuity improvements through week 96 of anti-VEGF treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOphthalmology Retina
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 27 2021

Keywords

  • BCVA
  • aflibercept
  • anti-VEGF
  • brolucizumab
  • intraretinal fluid
  • neovascular age-related macular degeneration
  • subretinal fluid
  • visual acuity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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