Effects of raloxifene and low-dose simvastatin coadministration on plasma lipids in postmenopausal women with primary hypercholesterolemia

William Insull, Michael H. Davidson, Pandurang M. Kulkarni, Suresh Siddhanti, Angelina V. Ciaccia, Cheryl A. Keech

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Raloxifene and low-dose simvastatin can each reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol without affecting high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides. The objective of this double-blind, 12-week study is to determine whether raloxifene and simvastatin coadministration gives added benefit beyond either monotherapy in affecting fasting lipoproteins and apolipoproteins. Ninety-five postmenopausal women with moderately elevated LDL cholesterol (mean, 146 mg/dL) were randomized to placebo, raloxifene 60 mg/d, simvastatin 10 mg/d, or raloxifene 60 mg/d coadministered with simvastatin 10 mg/d. Raloxifene, simvastatin, and coadministration therapy reduced mean LDL cholesterol by 10.5%, 23.3%, and 31.0% from baseline, respectively (P <. 003 vs baseline; P <. 02 vs placebo), and mean apolipoprotein B by 10.4%, 24.2%, and 30.0% from baseline, respectively (P <. 003 vs baseline; P <. 02 vs placebo). Each active treatment decreased non-HDL cholesterol compared with placebo (P <. 01). Coadministration treatment was more effective than either monotherapy in reducing LDL cholesterol (P <. 05). Coadministration treatment reduced mean apolipoprotein B (P <. 001) and non-HDL cholesterol (P <. 001) when compared with raloxifene, but was not significantly different when compared with simvastatin. Coadministration therapy increased HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 levels compared with placebo (P <. 02). No significant effect on triglycerides, very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and lipoprotein (a) occurred with any active treatment. Raloxifene, simvastatin, and the coadministration therapy were generally well tolerated with clinical adverse effects similar to placebo. No woman had clinically significant elevated liver function tests requiring drug discontinuation. Further data on safety and lipid-lowering effects are needed before raloxifene and statin coadministration may be considered as therapeutic interventions for treating postmenopausal women to achieve National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III treatment guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)939-946
Number of pages8
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume54
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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