Effect of Wound Contamination on Outcomes of Abdominal Wall Reconstruction Using Acellular Dermal Matrix: 14-Year Experience with More than 700 Patients

Abbas M. Hassan, Malke Asaad, Allison J. Seitz, Jun Liu, Charles E. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Patients with contaminated/dirty-infected defects are at high risk for postoperative complications after abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR). We evaluated outcomes of AWR using acellular dermal matrix (ADM) for mesh reinforcement and identified predictors of hernia recurrence (HR), surgical site occurrences (SSOs), and surgical site infections (SSIs). Study Design: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent AWR using ADM, from March 2005 to June 2019. Outcomes were compared between Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) wound classifications. The primary outcome measure was HR. Secondary outcomes were SSOs and SSIs. Results: We identified 725 AWRs using ADM that met the study criteria. Participants had a mean age of 60 ± 11.5 years, mean BMI of 31 ± 7 kg/m2, and mean follow-up time of 42 ± 29 months. Three hundred two patients (41.6%) had clean defects, 322 patients (44.4%) had clean-contaminated defects, and 101 patients (13.9%) had contaminated/dirty-infected defects. Patients with contaminated/dirty-infected defects had an HR rate of 20.8%, SSO rate of 54.5%, and SSI rate of 23.8%. Multivariate logistic regression found that contaminated/dirty-infected defects were independent predictors of SSOs (OR 2.99; 95% CI 1.72–5.18; p < 0.0001) and SSIs (OR 2.32; 95% CI 1.27–4.25; p = 0.006), but not HR (OR 1.06; 95% CI 0.57–1.98; p = 0.859). Conclusions: SSIs and SSOs increase as contamination levels rise, but the risk of HR does not. AWR with ADM provides safe and durable outcomes, even with increasing levels of contamination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)676-684
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume233
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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