Effect of equiosmolar solutions of mannitol versus hypertonic saline on intraoperative brain relaxation and electrolyte balance

Irene Rozet, Nuj Tontisirin, Saipin Muangman, Monica S. Vavilala, Michael J. Souter, Lorri A. Lee, M. Sean Kincaid, Gavin W. Britz, Arthur M. Lam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of equiosmolar solutions of mannitol and hypertonic saline (HS) on brain relaxation and electrolyte balance. METHODS: After institutional review board approval and informed consent, patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II-IV, scheduled to undergo craniotomy for various brain pathologies, were enrolled into this prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Patients received 5 ml/kg 20% mannitol (n = 20) or 3% HS (n = 20). Partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood was maintained at 35-40 mmHg, and central venous pressure was maintained at 5 mmHg or greater. Hemodynamic variables, fluid balance, blood gases, electrolytes, lactate, and osmolality (blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine) were measured at 0, 15, 30, and 60 min and 6 h after infusion; arteriovenous difference of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were calculated. The surgeon assessed brain relaxation on a four-point scale (1 = relaxed, 2 = satisfactory, 3 = firm, 4 = bulging). Appropriate statistical tests were used for comparison; P < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: There was no difference in brain relaxation (mannitol = 2, HS = 2 points; P = 0.8) or cerebral arteriovenous oxygen and lactate difference between HS and mannitol groups. Urine output with mannitol was higher than with HS (P < 0.03) and was associated with higher blood lactate over time (P < 0.001, compared with HS). Cerebrospinal fluid osmolality increased at 6 h in both groups (P < 0.05, compared with baseline). HS caused an increase in sodium in cerebrospinal fluid over time (P < 0.001, compared with mannitol). CONCLUSION: Mannitol and HS cause an increase in cerebrospinal fluid osmolality, and are associated with similar brain relaxation scores and arteriovenous oxygen and lactate difference during craniotomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)697-704
Number of pages8
JournalAnesthesiology
Volume107
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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