Effect of dietary lipids on levels of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in liver

Andrew Dannenberg, Eun K. Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Others have shown recently that dietary fish oil protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury in vivo. Fish oil was protective because it increased the clearance of acetaminophen via glucuronidation. This work left unresolved the basis for increased rates of glucuronidation in animals fed fish oil. We therefore have determined how the amount and type of lipid in the diet affect the activity of liver microsomal UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity. Male Wistar rats were fed a fat-free diet or isocaloric diets containing 5% corn oil, olive oil or fish oil for 4 weeks. The activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase was highest in rats fed fish oil and lowest in rats fed the fat-free diet. Treatment with corn oil and olive oil resulted in intermediate levels of activity. Diet-induced differences in amounts of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase were shown by immunoblotting and kinetic measurements. Treatment with fish oil resulted in a 3-fold increase in the amount of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase versus the fat-free diet. Corn oil and olive oil diets caused 2-fold increases in the amount of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase versus the fat-free diet. Fatty acid analysis of microsomal lipids showed that the fat-free diet was associated with decreased levels of arachidonic acid versus the corn oil or olive oil diets. The fish oil diet resulted in increased levels of ω-3 fatty acids versus the other diets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-340
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemical pharmacology
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 22 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Pharmacology

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