Earlier treatment in adults with high lifetime risk of cardiovascular diseases: What prevention trials are feasible and could change clinical practice? Report of a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Workshop

Ann Marie Navar, Lawrence J. Fine, Walter T. Ambrosius, Arleen Brown, Pamela S. Douglas, Karen Johnson, Amit V. Khera, Donald Lloyd-Jones, Erin D. Michos, Mahasin Mujahid, Daniel Muñoz, Khurram Nasir, Nicole Redmond, Paul M. Ridker, Jennifer Robinson, David Schopfer, Deborah F. Tate, Cora E. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

More than half of U.S. young adults have low ten-year but high lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Improving primary prevention in young adulthood may help reduce persistent CVD disparities and overall CVD morbidity and mortality. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a workshop in 2021 to identify potential trial opportunities in CVD prevention in young adults. The workshop identified promising interventions that could be tested, including interventions that focus on a single cardiovascular risk factor (e.g., lipids or inflammation) to multiple risk factor interventions (e.g., multicomponent lifestyle interventions or fixed-low dose combination of medications). Given the sample size and duration for a trial with hard endpoints, more research is needed on the utility of intermediate endpoints identified noninvasively such as subclinical coronary atherosclerosis as a surrogate endpoint. For now, clinical outcomes trials with hard endpoints will more likely change clinical practice. Trial efficiency depends on accurate identification of high-risk young adults, which can potentially be done using traditional risk equations, coronary artery calcium screening, computerized tomography coronary angiography, and polygenic risk scores. Trials in young adults should include enhanced recruitment strategies with intense community engagement to enroll a trial population that is racially, ethnically, geographically, and socially diverse. Despite the challenges in conducting large prevention trials in young adults, recent advances including innovation in clinical trial conduct, new therapies and successful interventions in older populations, and an increasing recognition of a lifespan approach to risk assessment have made such trials more feasible than ever. Disclosures: The views expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the National Institutes of Health; or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100430
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Risk assessment
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Earlier treatment in adults with high lifetime risk of cardiovascular diseases: What prevention trials are feasible and could change clinical practice? Report of a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Workshop'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this