Donor MHC class I peptides in conjunction with self-epitopes induce donor-specific tolerance in a dose-dependent manner but unable to abrogate chronic rejection

N. V. Semiletova, X. D. Shen, D. M. Feldman, R. W. Busuttil, J. W. Kupiec-Weglinski, R. M. Ghobrial

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding specific tolerance mechanisms is a primary goal of transplantation science. We have previously shown that hosts treated with MHC class I protein have donor sequences in the α1-helix of the α1 domain on a background of self-epitopes, resulting in the development of donor-specific tolerance. However, the nature of class I alloantigenic determinants that regulate the alloimmune response remains unclear. The α1-helical sequence of RT1.A,l which shares RT1.Au sequences, was substituted in the RT1.Aa molecule to produce the composite [α1h l/u]-RT1. Aa MHC class I allochimeric molecule. Immunodominant epitopes were identified within the hypervariable region of the α1 domain of RT1.Aa (ACI), RT1.Al (Lewis, LEW), and RT1.Au (Wistar Furth [WF]). To clarify the mechanisms of tolerance development through presentation of donor-type immunogenic epitopes and cryptic self-epitopes we used synthetic peptides corresponding to donor immunogenic determinants with peptides derived from recipient self-sequences (RT1.Aa-aa 10 to 49 P1 and 91 to 120 P3; and P2 RT1.Al/u 50 to 90). ACI recipients of LEW and WF cardiac allografts were injected through the portal vein (PV) at day 0 with four doses (2, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.125 mg/rat) of three peptide mixtures in conjunction with subtherapeutic CsA (10 mg/kg for 3 days). Allograft survival was strongly dose-dependent. Only low-dose regimens were consistent in tolerance induction, but such therapy did not abrogate development of chronic rejection (CR), unlike allochimeric therapy with soluble MHC class I protein. Different effects of protein or synthetic peptide therapies on development of CR suggest that development of specific tolerance is an active immunologic process and it depends on the form of allogeneic epitopes presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1937-1939
Number of pages3
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

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