Distinct epidemiological profiles associated with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC): A comprehensive analysis of the IBC registry at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Tamer M. Fouad, Naoto T. Ueno, Robert K. Yu, Joe E. Ensor, Ricardo H. Alvarez, Savitri Krishnamurthy, Anthony Lucci, James M. Reuben, Wei Yang, Jie S. Willey, Vicente Valero, Melissa L. Bondy, Massimo Cristofinalli, Sanjay Shete, Wendy A. Woodward, Randa El-Zein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background To date, studies on inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) lack comprehensive epidemiological data. We analyzed detailed prospectively collected clinical and epidemiological data from the IBC Registry at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods Patients with IBC (n = 248) were consecutively diagnosed and prospectively enrolled between November 2006 and April 2013. All patients were newly diagnosed and at least 18 years old. Secondary IBC was excluded. Overall 160 variables were collected and evaluated including sociodemographics, anthropometrics, tobacco and alcohol consumption, reproductive variables, and family history data. Results Mean age at diagnosis was 51.6 (±11.5 SD) years, and the majority of patients were White (77.8%). A mean BMI 25 kg/m 2 , irrespective of menopausal status, was observed in 80.2% of all patients, with 82.6% of African Americans being obese. Approximately 42.2% of patients were ever smokers, and 91% reported ever being pregnant. A history of breastfeeding was reported in 54% of patients, with significant differences between ethnic groups in favor of White women (P<0.0001). Other reproductive factors such as use of birth control pills & hormone replacement therapy were also more frequently associated with White women compare to other ethnic groups (P < 0.05). In the multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis, African American or Hispanic ethnicity, not having breastfed, higher clinical stage, and TNBC subtype were associated with shorter survival. Conclusion Our data suggest that IBC is associated with distinct epidemiological profiles. This information could assist in targeting patients with specific preventive strategies based on their modifiable behavioral patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0204372
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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