Differential expression of the seven-pass transmembrane cadherin genes Celsr1-3 and distribution of the Celsr2 protein during mouse development

Yasuyuki Shima, Neal G. Copeland, Debra J. Gilbert, Nancy A. Jenkins, Osamu Chisaka, Masatoshi Takeichi, Tadashi Uemura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drosophila Flamingo (Fmi) is an evolutionally conserved seven-pass transmembrane receptor of the cadherin superfamily. Fmi plays multiple roles in patterning neuronal processes and epithelial planar cell polarity. To explore the in vivo roles of Fmi homologs in mammals, we previously cloned one of the mouse homologs, mouse flamingo1/Celsr2. Here, we report the results of our study of its embryonic and postnatal expression patterns together with those of two other paralogs, Celsrl and Celsr3. Celsrl-3 expression was initiated broadly in the nervous system at early developmental stages, and each paralog showed characteristic expression patterns in the developing CNS. These genes were also expressed in several other organs, including the cochlea, where hair cells develop planar polarity, the kidney, and the whisker. The Celsr2 protein was distributed at intercellular boundaries in the whisker and on processes of neuronal cells such as hippocampal pyramidal cells, Purkinje cells, and olfactory neurons. Celsr2 is mapped to a distal region of the mouse chromosome 3. We discussed possible functions of seven-pass transmembrane cadherins in mouse development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-332
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental Dynamics
Volume223
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2002

Keywords

  • Cadherin superfamily
  • Celsr
  • Flamingo
  • Gene mapping
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • In situ hybridization
  • Mouse development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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