Detection of viable myocardium in segments with fixed defects on thallium-201 scintigraphy: Usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging early after acute myocardial infarction

Donald L. Johnston, Vinod K. Gupta, Richard E. Wendt, John J. Mahmarian, Mario S. Verani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect tissue viability in segments with persistent 201T1 defects early following acute myocardial infarction, 24 patients underwent MRI and adenosine 201T1 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging at approximately 6 days. Infarction was demonstrated on MRI using a velocity-compensated, T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequence. Wall thickening was assessed using a gradient-echo pulse sequence obtained in the same anatomic position. Viable myocardium was defined by MRI as a segment with increased signal intensity and preserved wall thickening. A fixed defect on the 201T1 SPECT images was defined as the absence of any redistribution 4 hours after the 201T1 infusion. Of 11 patients with redistribution on the 201T1 images in the infarction region, 10 (91%) had preserved wall thickening by MRI. Of 13 patients with fixed defects on the 201T1 images in the infarction region, 6 (46%) had preserved wall thickening by MRI. Of 7 patients with absent thickening, all had one or more segments with absent perfusion on redistribution imaging. Wall thickening tended to occur in patients who received thrombolytic therapy or who underwent revascularization procedures prior to imaging. The results of the present study suggest that spin-echo MRI with motion compensation can be used to identify viable myocardium in patients with fixed defects on 201T1 SPECT following acute myocardial infarction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)949-956
Number of pages8
JournalMagnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Keywords

  • Adenosine thallium scintigraphy
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Myocardial viability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Structural Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biophysics

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