Depressive symptoms, pain, and quality of life among patients with nonalcohol-related chronic pancreatitis

Wendy E. Balliet, Shenelle Edwards-Hampton, Jeffery J. Borckardt, Katherine Morgan, David Adams, Stefanie Owczarski, Alok Madan, Sarah K. Galloway, Eva R. Serber, Robert Malcolm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. The present study was conducted to determine if depressive symptoms were associated with variability in pain perception and quality of life among patients with nonalcohol-related chronic pancreatitis. Methods. The research design was cross-sectional, and self-report data was collected from 692 patients with nonalcohol-related, intractable pancreatitis. The mean age of the sample was 52.6 (SD=14.7); 41% of the sample were male. Participants completed the MOS SF12 Quality of Life Measure, the Center for Epidemiological Studies 10-item Depression Scale (CESD), and a numeric rating scale measure of "pain on average" from the Brief Pain Inventory. Results. Depressive symptoms were significantly related to participants' reports of increased pain and decreased quality of life. The mean CESD score of the sample was 10.6 (SD=6.5) and 52% of the sample scored above the clinical cutoff for the presence of significant depressive symptomology. Patients scoring above the clinical cutoff on the depression screening measure rated their pain as significantly higher than those below the cutoff (P<0.0001) and had significantly lower physical quality of life (P<0.0001) and lower mental quality of life (P<0.0001). Conclusion. Although causality cannot be determined based on cross-sectional, correlational data, findings suggest that among patients with nonalcoholic pancreatitis, the presence of depressive symptoms is common and may be a risk factor associated with increased pain and decreased quality of life. Thus, routine screening for depressive symptomology among patients with nonalcoholic pancreatitis may be warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number978646
JournalPain Research and Treatment
Volume2012
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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