Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robert A. Phillips, Vivian Fonseca, Richard E. Katholi, Janet B. McGill, Franz H. Messerli, David S.H. Bell, Philip Raskin, Jackson T. Wright, Malini Iyengar, Karen M. Anderson, Mary Ann Lukas, George L. Bakris

In the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial, carvedilol added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers had neutral or beneficial effects on glycemic measures compared with metoprolol tartrate. For the 1235 diabetic hypertensive GEMINI patients, the authors assessed treatment differences by race (white/black/other), age (continuous variable), and sex on hemoglobin A(1c), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and blood pressure. Both treatments significantly reduced blood pressure in all subgroups, but the metabolic effects of carvedilol were more beneficial in subgroups of race and sex. Carvedilol did not affect hemoglobin A(1c) but improved HOMA-IR results in all subgroups, significantly in males and "other race" subgroups. Metoprolol significantly increased hemoglobin A(1c) in all subgroups except "other race," with no effect on HOMA-IR findings. Differences vs metoprolol significantly favored carvedilol for hemoglobin A(1c) in white and female subgroups and favored carvedilol for HOMA-IR in black, "other race," and male subgroups. Carvedilol effects were favorable to adjustment of age as a covariate. In hypertensive patients with diabetes, carvedilol may be a more appropriate choice when beta-blockade is indicated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-217
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the cardiometabolic syndrome
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

PMID: 19040589

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Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus : Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study. / Phillips, Robert A.; Fonseca, Vivian; Katholi, Richard E.; McGill, Janet B.; Messerli, Franz H.; Bell, David S.H.; Raskin, Philip; Wright, Jackson T.; Iyengar, Malini; Anderson, Karen M.; Lukas, Mary Ann; Bakris, George L.

In: Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.01.2008, p. 211-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Phillips, RA, Fonseca, V, Katholi, RE, McGill, JB, Messerli, FH, Bell, DSH, Raskin, P, Wright, JT, Iyengar, M, Anderson, KM, Lukas, MA & Bakris, GL 2008, 'Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study.' Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome, vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 211-217. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00017.x

APA

Phillips, R. A., Fonseca, V., Katholi, R. E., McGill, J. B., Messerli, F. H., Bell, D. S. H., ... Bakris, G. L. (2008). Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study. Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome, 3(4), 211-217. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00017.x

Vancouver

Phillips RA, Fonseca V, Katholi RE, McGill JB, Messerli FH, Bell DSH et al. Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study. Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome. 2008 Jan 1;3(4):211-217. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00017.x

Author

Phillips, Robert A. ; Fonseca, Vivian ; Katholi, Richard E. ; McGill, Janet B. ; Messerli, Franz H. ; Bell, David S.H. ; Raskin, Philip ; Wright, Jackson T. ; Iyengar, Malini ; Anderson, Karen M. ; Lukas, Mary Ann ; Bakris, George L. / Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus : Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study. In: Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome. 2008 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 211-217.

BibTeX

@article{58e2f00d02484bef9151bf918585b8ff,
title = "Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study.",
abstract = "In the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial, carvedilol added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers had neutral or beneficial effects on glycemic measures compared with metoprolol tartrate. For the 1235 diabetic hypertensive GEMINI patients, the authors assessed treatment differences by race (white/black/other), age (continuous variable), and sex on hemoglobin A(1c), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and blood pressure. Both treatments significantly reduced blood pressure in all subgroups, but the metabolic effects of carvedilol were more beneficial in subgroups of race and sex. Carvedilol did not affect hemoglobin A(1c) but improved HOMA-IR results in all subgroups, significantly in males and {"}other race{"} subgroups. Metoprolol significantly increased hemoglobin A(1c) in all subgroups except {"}other race,{"} with no effect on HOMA-IR findings. Differences vs metoprolol significantly favored carvedilol for hemoglobin A(1c) in white and female subgroups and favored carvedilol for HOMA-IR in black, {"}other race,{"} and male subgroups. Carvedilol effects were favorable to adjustment of age as a covariate. In hypertensive patients with diabetes, carvedilol may be a more appropriate choice when beta-blockade is indicated.",
author = "Phillips, {Robert A.} and Vivian Fonseca and Katholi, {Richard E.} and McGill, {Janet B.} and Messerli, {Franz H.} and Bell, {David S.H.} and Philip Raskin and Wright, {Jackson T.} and Malini Iyengar and Anderson, {Karen M.} and Lukas, {Mary Ann} and Bakris, {George L.}",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00017.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
pages = "211--217",
journal = "Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome",
issn = "1559-4564",
publisher = "Le Jacq Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus

T2 - Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome

AU - Phillips, Robert A.

AU - Fonseca, Vivian

AU - Katholi, Richard E.

AU - McGill, Janet B.

AU - Messerli, Franz H.

AU - Bell, David S.H.

AU - Raskin, Philip

AU - Wright, Jackson T.

AU - Iyengar, Malini

AU - Anderson, Karen M.

AU - Lukas, Mary Ann

AU - Bakris, George L.

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - In the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial, carvedilol added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers had neutral or beneficial effects on glycemic measures compared with metoprolol tartrate. For the 1235 diabetic hypertensive GEMINI patients, the authors assessed treatment differences by race (white/black/other), age (continuous variable), and sex on hemoglobin A(1c), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and blood pressure. Both treatments significantly reduced blood pressure in all subgroups, but the metabolic effects of carvedilol were more beneficial in subgroups of race and sex. Carvedilol did not affect hemoglobin A(1c) but improved HOMA-IR results in all subgroups, significantly in males and "other race" subgroups. Metoprolol significantly increased hemoglobin A(1c) in all subgroups except "other race," with no effect on HOMA-IR findings. Differences vs metoprolol significantly favored carvedilol for hemoglobin A(1c) in white and female subgroups and favored carvedilol for HOMA-IR in black, "other race," and male subgroups. Carvedilol effects were favorable to adjustment of age as a covariate. In hypertensive patients with diabetes, carvedilol may be a more appropriate choice when beta-blockade is indicated.

AB - In the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial, carvedilol added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers had neutral or beneficial effects on glycemic measures compared with metoprolol tartrate. For the 1235 diabetic hypertensive GEMINI patients, the authors assessed treatment differences by race (white/black/other), age (continuous variable), and sex on hemoglobin A(1c), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and blood pressure. Both treatments significantly reduced blood pressure in all subgroups, but the metabolic effects of carvedilol were more beneficial in subgroups of race and sex. Carvedilol did not affect hemoglobin A(1c) but improved HOMA-IR results in all subgroups, significantly in males and "other race" subgroups. Metoprolol significantly increased hemoglobin A(1c) in all subgroups except "other race," with no effect on HOMA-IR findings. Differences vs metoprolol significantly favored carvedilol for hemoglobin A(1c) in white and female subgroups and favored carvedilol for HOMA-IR in black, "other race," and male subgroups. Carvedilol effects were favorable to adjustment of age as a covariate. In hypertensive patients with diabetes, carvedilol may be a more appropriate choice when beta-blockade is indicated.

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U2 - 10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00017.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00017.x

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VL - 3

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EP - 217

JO - Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome

JF - Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome

SN - 1559-4564

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ER -

ID: 16814163