Delayed autologous stem cell transplantation following cardiac transplantation experience in patients with cardiac amyloidosis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barry H. Trachtenberg, Rammurti T. Kamble, Lawrence Rice, Raquel Araujo-Gutierrez, Arvind Bhimaraj, Ashrith Guha, Myung H. Park, Imad Hussain, Brian A. Bruckner, Erik E. Suarez, David W. Victor, III, Horacio E. Adrogue, Kelty R. Baker, Jerry D. Estep

This study sought to retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients with light-chain amyloidosis (AL) with advanced cardiac involvement who were treated with a strategy of heart transplantation (HT) followed by delayed autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) at 1-year posttransplant. Patients with AL amyloidosis with substantial cardiac involvement have traditionally had very poor survival (eg, several months). A few select centers have reported their outcomes for HT followed by a strategy of early ASCT (ie, 6 months) for CA. The outcomes of patients undergoing a delayed strategy have not been reported. All patients with AL amyloidosis at a single institution undergoing evaluation for HT from 2004-2018 were included. Retrospective analyses were performed. Sixteen patients underwent HT (including two combined heart-kidney transplant) for AL amyloidosis. ASCT was performed in a total of nine patients to date at a median 13.5 months (12.8-32.9 months) post-HT. Survival was 87.5% at 1 year and 76.6% at 5 years, comparable to institutional outcomes for nonamyloid HT recipients. In addition to these 16 patients, two patients underwent combined heart-lung transplantation. A strategy of delayed ASCT 1-year post-HT for patients with AL amyloidosis is feasible, safe, and associated with comparable outcomes to those undergoing an earlier ASCT strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2900-2909
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume19
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

PMID: 31152491

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Delayed autologous stem cell transplantation following cardiac transplantation experience in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. / Trachtenberg, Barry H.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Rice, Lawrence; Araujo-Gutierrez, Raquel; Bhimaraj, Arvind; Guha, Ashrith; Park, Myung H.; Hussain, Imad; Bruckner, Brian A.; Suarez, Erik E.; Victor, III, David W.; Adrogue, Horacio E.; Baker, Kelty R.; Estep, Jerry D.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 19, No. 10, 01.10.2019, p. 2900-2909.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Trachtenberg, BH, Kamble, RT, Rice, L, Araujo-Gutierrez, R, Bhimaraj, A, Guha, A, Park, MH, Hussain, I, Bruckner, BA, Suarez, EE, Victor, III, DW, Adrogue, HE, Baker, KR & Estep, JD 2019, 'Delayed autologous stem cell transplantation following cardiac transplantation experience in patients with cardiac amyloidosis' American Journal of Transplantation, vol. 19, no. 10, pp. 2900-2909. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.15487

APA

Trachtenberg, B. H., Kamble, R. T., Rice, L., Araujo-Gutierrez, R., Bhimaraj, A., Guha, A., ... Estep, J. D. (2019). Delayed autologous stem cell transplantation following cardiac transplantation experience in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. American Journal of Transplantation, 19(10), 2900-2909. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.15487

Vancouver

Trachtenberg BH, Kamble RT, Rice L, Araujo-Gutierrez R, Bhimaraj A, Guha A et al. Delayed autologous stem cell transplantation following cardiac transplantation experience in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. American Journal of Transplantation. 2019 Oct 1;19(10):2900-2909. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.15487

Author

Trachtenberg, Barry H. ; Kamble, Rammurti T. ; Rice, Lawrence ; Araujo-Gutierrez, Raquel ; Bhimaraj, Arvind ; Guha, Ashrith ; Park, Myung H. ; Hussain, Imad ; Bruckner, Brian A. ; Suarez, Erik E. ; Victor, III, David W. ; Adrogue, Horacio E. ; Baker, Kelty R. ; Estep, Jerry D. / Delayed autologous stem cell transplantation following cardiac transplantation experience in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 10. pp. 2900-2909.

BibTeX

@article{4da85c8a822a4c73bd92377bfff7c076,
title = "Delayed autologous stem cell transplantation following cardiac transplantation experience in patients with cardiac amyloidosis",
abstract = "This study sought to retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients with light-chain amyloidosis (AL) with advanced cardiac involvement who were treated with a strategy of heart transplantation (HT) followed by delayed autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) at 1-year posttransplant. Patients with AL amyloidosis with substantial cardiac involvement have traditionally had very poor survival (eg, several months). A few select centers have reported their outcomes for HT followed by a strategy of early ASCT (ie, 6 months) for CA. The outcomes of patients undergoing a delayed strategy have not been reported. All patients with AL amyloidosis at a single institution undergoing evaluation for HT from 2004-2018 were included. Retrospective analyses were performed. Sixteen patients underwent HT (including two combined heart-kidney transplant) for AL amyloidosis. ASCT was performed in a total of nine patients to date at a median 13.5 months (12.8-32.9 months) post-HT. Survival was 87.5{\%} at 1 year and 76.6{\%} at 5 years, comparable to institutional outcomes for nonamyloid HT recipients. In addition to these 16 patients, two patients underwent combined heart-lung transplantation. A strategy of delayed ASCT 1-year post-HT for patients with AL amyloidosis is feasible, safe, and associated with comparable outcomes to those undergoing an earlier ASCT strategy.",
keywords = "autotransplantation, bone marrow/hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cardiovascular disease, clinical research/practice, heart failure/injury, heart transplantation/cardiology, stem cells",
author = "Trachtenberg, {Barry H.} and Kamble, {Rammurti T.} and Lawrence Rice and Raquel Araujo-Gutierrez and Arvind Bhimaraj and Ashrith Guha and Park, {Myung H.} and Imad Hussain and Bruckner, {Brian A.} and Suarez, {Erik E.} and {Victor, III}, {David W.} and Adrogue, {Horacio E.} and Baker, {Kelty R.} and Estep, {Jerry D.}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ajt.15487",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "2900--2909",
journal = "American Journal of Transplantation",
issn = "1600-6135",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Delayed autologous stem cell transplantation following cardiac transplantation experience in patients with cardiac amyloidosis

AU - Trachtenberg, Barry H.

AU - Kamble, Rammurti T.

AU - Rice, Lawrence

AU - Araujo-Gutierrez, Raquel

AU - Bhimaraj, Arvind

AU - Guha, Ashrith

AU - Park, Myung H.

AU - Hussain, Imad

AU - Bruckner, Brian A.

AU - Suarez, Erik E.

AU - Victor, III, David W.

AU - Adrogue, Horacio E.

AU - Baker, Kelty R.

AU - Estep, Jerry D.

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - This study sought to retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients with light-chain amyloidosis (AL) with advanced cardiac involvement who were treated with a strategy of heart transplantation (HT) followed by delayed autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) at 1-year posttransplant. Patients with AL amyloidosis with substantial cardiac involvement have traditionally had very poor survival (eg, several months). A few select centers have reported their outcomes for HT followed by a strategy of early ASCT (ie, 6 months) for CA. The outcomes of patients undergoing a delayed strategy have not been reported. All patients with AL amyloidosis at a single institution undergoing evaluation for HT from 2004-2018 were included. Retrospective analyses were performed. Sixteen patients underwent HT (including two combined heart-kidney transplant) for AL amyloidosis. ASCT was performed in a total of nine patients to date at a median 13.5 months (12.8-32.9 months) post-HT. Survival was 87.5% at 1 year and 76.6% at 5 years, comparable to institutional outcomes for nonamyloid HT recipients. In addition to these 16 patients, two patients underwent combined heart-lung transplantation. A strategy of delayed ASCT 1-year post-HT for patients with AL amyloidosis is feasible, safe, and associated with comparable outcomes to those undergoing an earlier ASCT strategy.

AB - This study sought to retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients with light-chain amyloidosis (AL) with advanced cardiac involvement who were treated with a strategy of heart transplantation (HT) followed by delayed autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) at 1-year posttransplant. Patients with AL amyloidosis with substantial cardiac involvement have traditionally had very poor survival (eg, several months). A few select centers have reported their outcomes for HT followed by a strategy of early ASCT (ie, 6 months) for CA. The outcomes of patients undergoing a delayed strategy have not been reported. All patients with AL amyloidosis at a single institution undergoing evaluation for HT from 2004-2018 were included. Retrospective analyses were performed. Sixteen patients underwent HT (including two combined heart-kidney transplant) for AL amyloidosis. ASCT was performed in a total of nine patients to date at a median 13.5 months (12.8-32.9 months) post-HT. Survival was 87.5% at 1 year and 76.6% at 5 years, comparable to institutional outcomes for nonamyloid HT recipients. In addition to these 16 patients, two patients underwent combined heart-lung transplantation. A strategy of delayed ASCT 1-year post-HT for patients with AL amyloidosis is feasible, safe, and associated with comparable outcomes to those undergoing an earlier ASCT strategy.

KW - autotransplantation

KW - bone marrow/hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

KW - cardiovascular disease

KW - clinical research/practice

KW - heart failure/injury

KW - heart transplantation/cardiology

KW - stem cells

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068425606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068425606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ajt.15487

DO - 10.1111/ajt.15487

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 2900

EP - 2909

JO - American Journal of Transplantation

T2 - American Journal of Transplantation

JF - American Journal of Transplantation

SN - 1600-6135

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 50688150