4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study sought to retrospectively investigate the outcomes of patients with light-chain amyloidosis (AL) with advanced cardiac involvement who were treated with a strategy of heart transplantation (HT) followed by delayed autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) at 1-year posttransplant. Patients with AL amyloidosis with substantial cardiac involvement have traditionally had very poor survival (eg, several months). A few select centers have reported their outcomes for HT followed by a strategy of early ASCT (ie, 6 months) for CA. The outcomes of patients undergoing a delayed strategy have not been reported. All patients with AL amyloidosis at a single institution undergoing evaluation for HT from 2004-2018 were included. Retrospective analyses were performed. Sixteen patients underwent HT (including two combined heart-kidney transplant) for AL amyloidosis. ASCT was performed in a total of nine patients to date at a median 13.5 months (12.8-32.9 months) post-HT. Survival was 87.5% at 1 year and 76.6% at 5 years, comparable to institutional outcomes for nonamyloid HT recipients. In addition to these 16 patients, two patients underwent combined heart-lung transplantation. A strategy of delayed ASCT 1-year post-HT for patients with AL amyloidosis is feasible, safe, and associated with comparable outcomes to those undergoing an earlier ASCT strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2900-2909
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume19
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Keywords

  • autotransplantation
  • bone marrow/hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • cardiovascular disease
  • clinical research/practice
  • heart failure/injury
  • heart transplantation/cardiology
  • stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Delayed autologous stem cell transplantation following cardiac transplantation experience in patients with cardiac amyloidosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this