Correlations between peripheral levels of inflammatory mediators and frontolimbic structures in bipolar disorder: an exploratory analysis

Satyajit Mohite, Haitham Salem, Thiago Cordeiro, Jonika Tannous, Benson Mwangi, Sudhakar Selvaraj, Jair C. Soares, Marsal Sanches, Antonio L. Teixeira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Altered peripheral immune/inflammatory system and brain volumetric changes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). This study aimed to evaluate how peripheral levels of cytokines are related to volumetric brain changes in euthymic patients with BD. Methods Euthymic patients with BD (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 22) were enrolled in this exploratory study. Blood samples were collected on the same day of clinical assessment and neuroimaging. Cytokines were measured through cytometric bead array method. Neuroimaging data were acquired using a sagittal three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging T1-weighted fast field echo sequence and was processed using FreeSurfer. Results Compared to controls, BD patients had significantly lower volumes in the cingulate, medial-orbitofrontal (MOF) and parahippocampal regions. We found a negative correlation between right MOF volume and interferon-gamma levels (β = -0.431, P =.049) and a positive correlation between interleukin-10 levels and left posterior cingulate volume (β = 0.457, P =.048). Conclusion Our results support the involvement of inflammatory pathways in structural brain changes in BD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-644
Number of pages6
JournalCNS spectrums
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 14 2022

Keywords

  • Bipolar disorder
  • accelerated aging
  • gray matter
  • neuroimaging
  • neuroinflammation
  • prefrontal cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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