Continuous versus interrupted suturing of traumatic lacerations: A time, cost, and complication rate comparison

Sean Boutros, Adam B. Weinfeld, Jeffrey D. Friedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The most frequently used techniques in the repair of traumatic lacerations are interrupted and continuous suturing. Methods: We performed a prospective study of interrupted and continuous suturing techniques evaluating suturing rates, suture economy, and complication rates in the repair of 101 traumatic lacerations. Results: Continuous closure was accomplished at a statistically faster rate (mean, 0.276 cm/min) than interrupted closure (mean, 0.175 cm/min; p = 0.004). Less suture material was used in the continuous closures (0.321 suture packets/cm) than in interrupted closures (0.508 suture packets/cm; p = 0.03). No statistically significant difference existed in the complication rate between the two closure methods (continuous, 1 of 44; interrupted, 1 of 57; p = 0.59). Conclusion: Although suturing technique should be selected primarily on the basis of wound characteristics and surgeon preference, continuous suturing warrants consideration for the closure of traumatic lacerations because of its time/material economy and the lack increased complication rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)495-497
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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