Continuous and discontinuous drawing: High temporal variability exists only in discontinuous circling in young children

Jin Bo, Amy J. Bastian, José L. Contreras-Vidal, Florian A. Kagerer, Jane E. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors studied whether the drawing variability in young children is best explicable by (a) demands on the explicit timing system, (b) an underdeveloped ability to control limb dynamics, or (c) both. The explicit timing demands were lower in continuous drawing in comparison with the discontinuous task. The authors manipulated limb dynamics by changing the number of joints involved, with line drawing requiring fewer joints than circle drawing. Results showed that young children had high temporal variability in discontinuous circling but not in other conditions. The authors argue that both explicit timing and dynamic complexity of limb control may be determinants of temporal consistency and may thus play an important role in the development of drawing and writing skills in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-399
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Motor Behavior
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Keywords

  • Cerebellum
  • Circle drawing
  • Dynamic control
  • Timing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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