Confirmation or exclusion of stage I hypertension by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

Carlton R. Moore, Lawrence R. Krakoff, Robert A. Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Criteria for the diagnosis or exclusion of hypertension using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring have not been agreed upon. We designed this study to provide a statistically based guide for using results of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to resolve this issue. To generate this information, we used a database of 228 subjects (135 men, 93 women; average age, 45 years) referred by their primary physicians over the past 7 years for evaluation of borderline or stage I hypertension (average blood pressure, 148/92 mm Hg; SD, ± 17.5/12.2 mm Hg). In this population, the pooled SDs of systolic and diastolic ambulatory blood pressures were 13.8 and 11.6 mm Hg, respectively. Using the pooled SD, we calculated the probability that a patient's blood pressure falls within the hypertensive range (>140/90 mm Hg). The 95% confidence interval for each subject's blood pressure was also determined. For example, if 40 ambulatory blood pressure measurements are performed on a subject and the average systolic ambulatory blood pressure is 137 mm Hg, then there is a 10% probability that the patient's 'true' average blood pressure is actually in the hypertensive range. By contrast, if the systolic pressure is 143 mm Hg, there is a 90% probability that the patient is hypertensive. This approach may be useful for clinical decision making and also for the design of clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1109-1113
Number of pages5
JournalHypertension
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Keywords

  • ambulatory
  • blood pressure monitoring
  • hypertension detection and control
  • statistics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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