Combined adverse effect of African American race and deep stromal invasion on survival following radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer

Heidi Sapp, Laura Goetzl, William Creasman, Matthew Kohler, Paul Underwood, Nestor F. Esnaola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to explore the effect of African American race on survival following radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer. Study Design: We reviewed all cases of stage IA-IIA cervical cancer treated with radical hysterectomy at our institution (1987-2001). Characteristics between races were compared using Mann Whitney U and χ2 tests. Hazard ratios (HR) of survival were calculated using Cox regression. Results: We identified 134 Caucasian and 66 African American patients. There was a trend toward worse survival among African Americans (81.8% vs 88.8%, P = .165). An interaction effect between race and depth of stromal invasion was observed (P = .005), and the combination of African American race and deep stromal invasion had a powerful, independent effect on survival (HR of death 7.04 [95% confidence interval 2.48 to 19.94]). Conclusion: The combination of African American race and deep stromal invasion has an adverse effect on survival following radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and may warrant use of adjuvant therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)196.e1-196.e7
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume199
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Keywords

  • African American race
  • cervical cancer
  • depth of stromal invasion
  • radical hysterectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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