Classification of stand-to-sit and sit-to-stand movement from low frequency EEG with locality preserving dimensionality reduction

Thomas C. Bulea, Saurabh Prasad, Atilla Kilicarslan, Jose L. Contreras-Vidal

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated decoding of lower extremity limb kinematics from noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG), showing feasibility for development of an EEG-based brain-machine interface (BMI) to restore mobility following paralysis. Here, we present a new technique that preserves the statistical richness of EEG data to classify movement state from time-embedded low frequency EEG signals. We tested this new classifier, using cross-validation procedures, during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit activity in 10 subjects and found decoding accuracy of greater than 95% on average. These results suggest that this classification technique could be used in a BMI system that, when combined with a robotic exoskeleton, can restore functional movement to individuals with paralysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013
Pages6341-6344
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013 - Osaka, Japan
Duration: Jul 3 2013Jul 7 2013

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Other

Other2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013
CountryJapan
CityOsaka
Period7/3/137/7/13

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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