Circulating endothelial progenitor cells and coronary collaterals in patients with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction

Eli I. Lev, Neal Kleiman, Yochai Birnbaum, David Harris, Martin Korbling, Zeev Estrov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow-derived cells that are augmented in response to ischemia and incorporated into neovascularization sites. We sought to determine whether circulating EPCs are related to collateral formation following non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Methods: Twenty patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within a week of NSTEMI were divided into two groups: patients without collaterals (coll-, n = 10) and patients with Rentrop grade 3-4 collaterals (coll+, n = 10). Blood samples were drawn before PCI and 24 ± 2 h after PCI. EPC colonies were grown from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, characterized, and counted. Using flow cytometry the percentage of cells coexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and CD133 was determined. Results: The coll+ group had higher degree of culprit vessel stenosis and lower initial thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow grade. The relative number of EPCs before PCI was significantly higher in the coll+ group than in the coll-group (1.49 ± 0.9% vs. 0.77 ± 0.4%, p = 0.045). There were no significant intergroup differences in the number of EPC colony-forming cells. The number of EPC colonies increased in the coll- group after PCI (9.5 ± 4.8 to 14.0 ± 5.9/106 cells, p = 0.01). Conclusions: This study supports an association between circulating EPC levels and collateral formation in patients with an NSTEMI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)408-414
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Vascular Research
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

Keywords

  • Collateral circulation
  • Endothelial progenitor cells
  • Myocardial infarction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

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