Chronic disease self-management education courses: Utilization by low-income, middle-aged participants

Lindsey N. Horrell, Shawn M. Kneipp, Sangnam Ahn, Samuel D. Towne, Chivon A. Mingo, Marcia G. Ory, Matthew Lee Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Individuals living in lower-income areas face an increased prevalence of chronic disease and, oftentimes, greater barriers to optimal self-management. Disparities in disease management are seen across the lifespan, but are particularly notable among middle-aged adults. Although evidence-based Chronic Disease Self-management Education courses are available to enhance self-management among members of this at-risk population, little information is available to determine the extent to which these courses are reaching those at greatest risk. The purpose of this study is to compare the extent to which middle-aged adults from lower- and higher-income areas have engaged in CDSME courses, and to identify the sociodemographic characteristics of lower-income, middle aged participants. Methods: The results of this study were produced through analysis of secondary data collected during the Communities Putting Prevention to Work: Chronic Disease Self-Management Program initiative. During this initiative, data was collected from 100,000 CDSME participants across 45 states within the United States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Results: Of the entire sample included in this analysis (19,365 participants), 55 people lived in the most impoverished counties. While these 55 participants represented just 0.3% of the total study sample, researchers found this group completed courses more frequently than participants from less impoverished counties once enrolled. Conclusion: These results signal a need to enhance participation of middle-aged adults from lower-income areas in CDSME courses. The results also provide evidence that can be used to inform future program delivery choices, including decisions regarding recruitment materials, program leaders, and program delivery sites, to better engage this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number114
JournalInternational Journal for Equity in Health
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 2017

Keywords

  • Chronic disease
  • Chronic Disease Self-management Education Courses: Utilization by Low-income
  • Health disparities
  • Low-income
  • Middle-aged Participants
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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