Characterizing aggression and its association to anger and hostility among male veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder

Andra L. Teten, Lisa A. Miller, Matthew S. Stanford, Nancy J. Petersen, Sara D. Bailey, Robert L. Collins, Nancy Jo Dunn, Thomas A. Kent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The basis for the associations among anger, hostility, aggressive behavior, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains unclear. We suggest classifying aggressive behavior may elucidate the associations among these factors. On the basis of diagnostic and neurobiological similarities between impulsive aggression (IA) and PTSD, we proposed that IA was the predominant form of aggression in PTSD and that anger and hostility would not signifi cantly predict PTSD when IA was also included as a predictor. Methods: We used cross-sectional self-report data obtained from two samples of male veterans ( N = 136). Results: Over 70% of veterans with PTSD reported IA compared to 29% of those without PTSD. IA, not anger, hostility, or premeditated aggression signifi cantly predicted a diagnosis of PTSD. Conclusions: Associations between anger and PTSD may be unique to individuals with IA, and considering impulsive and premeditated aggressors separately may account for the heterogeneity found within samples of aggressive veterans with PTSD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-410
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume175
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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