Cell attachment to frozen sections of injured adult mouse brain: Effects of tenascin antibody and lectin perturbation of wound-related extracellular matrix molecules

Eric D. Laywell, Paul Friedman, Kristy Harrington, James T. Robertson, Dennis A. Steindler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous studies describing the use of cryoculture methods have focused on the efficacy of the method for studying neuron attachment and neurite outgrowth on intact sections of nerve, and rodent and even human brain. The cryoculture method has shown promise for determining the presence of cell attachment and neurite-growth-inhibiting molecules in such specimens, and some studies have also attempted to neutralize such molecules with antibodies to myelin inhibitory proteins, nerve growth factor, or factors present in conditioned media that may counteract the repulsiveness of some of these molecules preserved in sections of for example, myelinated nerves or adult brain white matter. The present study describes the novel use of lesioned central nervous system cryocultures as substrates for investigating the attachment of embryonic neurons and PC12 cells. In addition to demonstrating the use of this novel scar substrate to extend previous 'scar-in-a-dish' models (David et al. (1990) Neuron, 5: 463-469: Rudge and Silver (1990) J. Neurosci., 10: 3594-3603; Rudge et al. (1989) Exp. Neurol., 103: 1-16), the present study also describes antibody and lectin perturbations of putative inhibitory molecules that result in an enhanced attachment of cells to cryosection cultures of brain and spinal cord wounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-108
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Keywords

  • Antibody perturbation
  • Brain wound
  • Cryoculture
  • In vitro bioassay
  • Lectin perturbation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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