Cardiovascular impact of manual and automated turns in ICU

Nikhil S. Padhye, Shannan K. Hamlin, Audrius Brazdeikis, Sandra K. Hanneman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are typically turned manually by nursing staff to reduce the risk of developing ventilator associated pneumonia and other problems in the lungs. However, turning can induce changes in the heart rate and blood pressure that can at times have a destabilizing effect. We report here on the early stage of a study that has been undertaken to measure the cardiovascular impact of manual turning, and compare it to changes induced when patients lie on automated beds that turn continuously. Heart rate and blood pressure data were analyzed over ensembles of turns with autoregressive models for comparing baseline level to the dynamic response. Manual turning stimulated a response in the heart rate that lasted for a median of 20 minutes and was of magnitude 5 to 13 bpm. The corresponding response in mean arterial pressure was 11 to 19 mm Hg, lasting for 8 to 21 minutes. There was no discernible response of either variable to automated turns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1844-1847
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424432967
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Event31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Sep 2 2009Sep 6 2009

Conference

Conference31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period9/2/099/6/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

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