Cardiac ejection fraction: Phantom study comparing cine MR imaging, radionuclide blood pool imaging, and ventriculography

Jörg F. Debatin, Scott N. Nadel, John F. Paolini, H. Dirk Sostman, R. Edward Coleman, Avery J. Evans, Craig Beam, Charles E. Spritzer, Thomas M. Bashore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

The accuracy and reproducibility of cardiac ejection fraction (EF) measurements based on cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, radionuclide multigated acquisition (MUGA) blood pool imaging, and angiographic ventriculography were evaluated by comparing them with a volumetrically determined standard. A biventricular, compliant, fluid-filled heart phantom was developed to mimic normal cardiac anatomy and physiology. Ventricular EFs were measured with cine MR imaging by summation of nine contiguous 10-mm-thick sections in short and long axis, with single-plane ventriculography, and with MUGA. Three measurements were performed with each modality for each of three EFs. Ventriculography was least accurate, with average relative errors ranging from 7.9% for the largest EF to 60.1% for the smallest. Cine MR was most accurate, with average relative errors ranging from 4.4% to 8.5%. MUGA EF measurements showed good correlation, with average relative errors ranging from 7.1% to 22.4%. Comparison of the error variances for the three modalities with the F test revealed that MR and MUGA EF measurements were significantly more accurate than those based on ventriculography (P less than .01). No significant difference was demonstrated between the accuracy of short- and long-axis cine MR acquisitions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-142
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

Keywords

  • Cine studies
  • Comparative studies
  • Heart, MR, 52.1214
  • Heart, function
  • Heart, injection fraction
  • Heart, ventricles, 52.1214
  • Phantoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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