Canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum is not altered with endurance exercise training

Charlotte Tate, Mary Hamra, Genshun Shin, George Taffet, Perley McBride, Mark Entman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

To investigate the effect of exercise training on calcium movements by isolated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), mongrel dogs either remained sedentary (S) or were exercise-trained (E) via running for a period of 8-10 wk. The trained state was confirmed by the increase in skeletal muscle citrate synthase activity and decreases in submaximal exercise heart rates in the E group but not in the S dogs. The properties of isolated cardiac SR were identical between the groups. The variables tested included ATP-dependent calcium transport and calcium-stimulated ATPase activity. Importantly, there was no difference in spontaneous calcium release which occurred after peak ATP-dependent calcium accumulation was reached. Calcium release from passively loaded vesicles induced by calcium and ionophore also did not differ in the SR isolated from the E dogs. The change in the affinity of the SR CaATPase for calcium after the addition of the polyanion, heparin, was similar in both groups, indicating that the regulation of calcium-stimulated ATPase activity by the SR protein, phospholamban, is not modified by exercise training. We conclude that exercise training of 8-10 wk duration does not alter the calcium handling properties of cardiac SR isolated from mongrel dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1246-1251
Number of pages6
JournalMedicine and science in sports and exercise
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1993

Keywords

  • CALCIUM RELEASE
  • CALCIUM TRANSPORT
  • HEART
  • PHOSPHOLAMBAN

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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