Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells contribute to the angiogenic switch in tumor growth and metastatic progression

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dingcheng Gao, Daniel Nolan, Kevin McDonnell, Linda Vahdat, Robert Benezra, Nasser Altorki, Vivek Mittal

Emerging evidence indicates that bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to angiogenesis-mediated growth of certain tumors in mice and human. EPCs regulate the angiogenic switch via paracrine secretion of proangiogenic growth factors and by direct luminal incorporation into sprouting nascent vessels. While the contributions of EPCs to neovessel formation in spontaneous and transplanted tumors and to the metastatic transition have been reported to be relatively low, remarkably, specific EPC ablation in vivo has resulted in severe angiogenesis inhibition and impaired primary and metastatic tumor growth. The existence of a BM reservoir of EPCs, and the selective involvement of EPCs in neovascularization, have attracted considerable interest because these cells represent novel target for therapeutic intervention. In addition, EPCs are also being used as pharmacodynamic surrogate markers for monitoring cancer progression, as well as for optimizing efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapies in the clinic. This review will focus primarily on recent advances and emerging concepts in the field of EPC biology and discuss ongoing debates involving the role of EPCs in tumor neovascularization. For detailed information on the in vitro characterization of EPCs contribution to non-tumor pathologies, the reader is directed towards several excellent reviews and publications [F. Bertolini, Y. Shaked, P. Mancuso and R.S. Kerbel, Nat. Rev., Cancer 6 (2006) 835-845. [1]] [J.M. Hill, T. Finkel and A.A. Quyyumi, Vox Sang. 87 Suppl 2 (2004) 31-37. [2]] [A.Y. Khakoo and T. Finkel, Annu. Rev. Med. 56 (2005) 79-101. [3]] [H.G. Kopp, C.A. Ramos and S. Rafii, Curr. Opin. Hematol. 13 (2006) 175-181. [4]; K.K. Hirschi, D.A. Ingram and M.C. Yoder, Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 28 (2008) 1584-1595. [5]; F. Timmermans, J. Plum, M.C. Yoder, D.A. Ingram, B. Vandekerckhove and J. Case, J. Cell. Mol. Med. 13 (2009) 87-102. [6]] and reviews by Bertolini, Voest and Yoder in this issue.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-40
Number of pages8
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer
Volume1796
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

PMID: 19460418

PMCID: PMC3649840

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Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells contribute to the angiogenic switch in tumor growth and metastatic progression. / Gao, Dingcheng; Nolan, Daniel; McDonnell, Kevin; Vahdat, Linda; Benezra, Robert; Altorki, Nasser; Mittal, Vivek.

In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer, Vol. 1796, No. 1, 01.08.2009, p. 33-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Gao, D, Nolan, D, McDonnell, K, Vahdat, L, Benezra, R, Altorki, N & Mittal, V 2009, 'Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells contribute to the angiogenic switch in tumor growth and metastatic progression' Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer, vol. 1796, no. 1, pp. 33-40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbcan.2009.05.001

APA

Gao, D., Nolan, D., McDonnell, K., Vahdat, L., Benezra, R., Altorki, N., & Mittal, V. (2009). Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells contribute to the angiogenic switch in tumor growth and metastatic progression. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer, 1796(1), 33-40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbcan.2009.05.001

Vancouver

Gao D, Nolan D, McDonnell K, Vahdat L, Benezra R, Altorki N et al. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells contribute to the angiogenic switch in tumor growth and metastatic progression. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer. 2009 Aug 1;1796(1):33-40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbcan.2009.05.001

Author

Gao, Dingcheng ; Nolan, Daniel ; McDonnell, Kevin ; Vahdat, Linda ; Benezra, Robert ; Altorki, Nasser ; Mittal, Vivek. / Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells contribute to the angiogenic switch in tumor growth and metastatic progression. In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer. 2009 ; Vol. 1796, No. 1. pp. 33-40.

BibTeX

@article{9008b7b614c94514be53a4a3c1c8f493,
title = "Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells contribute to the angiogenic switch in tumor growth and metastatic progression",
abstract = "Emerging evidence indicates that bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to angiogenesis-mediated growth of certain tumors in mice and human. EPCs regulate the angiogenic switch via paracrine secretion of proangiogenic growth factors and by direct luminal incorporation into sprouting nascent vessels. While the contributions of EPCs to neovessel formation in spontaneous and transplanted tumors and to the metastatic transition have been reported to be relatively low, remarkably, specific EPC ablation in vivo has resulted in severe angiogenesis inhibition and impaired primary and metastatic tumor growth. The existence of a BM reservoir of EPCs, and the selective involvement of EPCs in neovascularization, have attracted considerable interest because these cells represent novel target for therapeutic intervention. In addition, EPCs are also being used as pharmacodynamic surrogate markers for monitoring cancer progression, as well as for optimizing efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapies in the clinic. This review will focus primarily on recent advances and emerging concepts in the field of EPC biology and discuss ongoing debates involving the role of EPCs in tumor neovascularization. For detailed information on the in vitro characterization of EPCs contribution to non-tumor pathologies, the reader is directed towards several excellent reviews and publications [F. Bertolini, Y. Shaked, P. Mancuso and R.S. Kerbel, Nat. Rev., Cancer 6 (2006) 835-845. [1]] [J.M. Hill, T. Finkel and A.A. Quyyumi, Vox Sang. 87 Suppl 2 (2004) 31-37. [2]] [A.Y. Khakoo and T. Finkel, Annu. Rev. Med. 56 (2005) 79-101. [3]] [H.G. Kopp, C.A. Ramos and S. Rafii, Curr. Opin. Hematol. 13 (2006) 175-181. [4]; K.K. Hirschi, D.A. Ingram and M.C. Yoder, Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 28 (2008) 1584-1595. [5]; F. Timmermans, J. Plum, M.C. Yoder, D.A. Ingram, B. Vandekerckhove and J. Case, J. Cell. Mol. Med. 13 (2009) 87-102. [6]] and reviews by Bertolini, Voest and Yoder in this issue.",
keywords = "Angiogenesis, Bone marrow, Bone marrow transaplantation, Chemotherapy, EPCs, HSCs, Metastasis",
author = "Dingcheng Gao and Daniel Nolan and Kevin McDonnell and Linda Vahdat and Robert Benezra and Nasser Altorki and Vivek Mittal",
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pages = "33--40",
journal = "Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer",
issn = "0304-419X",
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RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells contribute to the angiogenic switch in tumor growth and metastatic progression

AU - Gao, Dingcheng

AU - Nolan, Daniel

AU - McDonnell, Kevin

AU - Vahdat, Linda

AU - Benezra, Robert

AU - Altorki, Nasser

AU - Mittal, Vivek

PY - 2009/8/1

Y1 - 2009/8/1

N2 - Emerging evidence indicates that bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to angiogenesis-mediated growth of certain tumors in mice and human. EPCs regulate the angiogenic switch via paracrine secretion of proangiogenic growth factors and by direct luminal incorporation into sprouting nascent vessels. While the contributions of EPCs to neovessel formation in spontaneous and transplanted tumors and to the metastatic transition have been reported to be relatively low, remarkably, specific EPC ablation in vivo has resulted in severe angiogenesis inhibition and impaired primary and metastatic tumor growth. The existence of a BM reservoir of EPCs, and the selective involvement of EPCs in neovascularization, have attracted considerable interest because these cells represent novel target for therapeutic intervention. In addition, EPCs are also being used as pharmacodynamic surrogate markers for monitoring cancer progression, as well as for optimizing efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapies in the clinic. This review will focus primarily on recent advances and emerging concepts in the field of EPC biology and discuss ongoing debates involving the role of EPCs in tumor neovascularization. For detailed information on the in vitro characterization of EPCs contribution to non-tumor pathologies, the reader is directed towards several excellent reviews and publications [F. Bertolini, Y. Shaked, P. Mancuso and R.S. Kerbel, Nat. Rev., Cancer 6 (2006) 835-845. [1]] [J.M. Hill, T. Finkel and A.A. Quyyumi, Vox Sang. 87 Suppl 2 (2004) 31-37. [2]] [A.Y. Khakoo and T. Finkel, Annu. Rev. Med. 56 (2005) 79-101. [3]] [H.G. Kopp, C.A. Ramos and S. Rafii, Curr. Opin. Hematol. 13 (2006) 175-181. [4]; K.K. Hirschi, D.A. Ingram and M.C. Yoder, Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 28 (2008) 1584-1595. [5]; F. Timmermans, J. Plum, M.C. Yoder, D.A. Ingram, B. Vandekerckhove and J. Case, J. Cell. Mol. Med. 13 (2009) 87-102. [6]] and reviews by Bertolini, Voest and Yoder in this issue.

AB - Emerging evidence indicates that bone marrow (BM)-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to angiogenesis-mediated growth of certain tumors in mice and human. EPCs regulate the angiogenic switch via paracrine secretion of proangiogenic growth factors and by direct luminal incorporation into sprouting nascent vessels. While the contributions of EPCs to neovessel formation in spontaneous and transplanted tumors and to the metastatic transition have been reported to be relatively low, remarkably, specific EPC ablation in vivo has resulted in severe angiogenesis inhibition and impaired primary and metastatic tumor growth. The existence of a BM reservoir of EPCs, and the selective involvement of EPCs in neovascularization, have attracted considerable interest because these cells represent novel target for therapeutic intervention. In addition, EPCs are also being used as pharmacodynamic surrogate markers for monitoring cancer progression, as well as for optimizing efficacy of anti-angiogenic therapies in the clinic. This review will focus primarily on recent advances and emerging concepts in the field of EPC biology and discuss ongoing debates involving the role of EPCs in tumor neovascularization. For detailed information on the in vitro characterization of EPCs contribution to non-tumor pathologies, the reader is directed towards several excellent reviews and publications [F. Bertolini, Y. Shaked, P. Mancuso and R.S. Kerbel, Nat. Rev., Cancer 6 (2006) 835-845. [1]] [J.M. Hill, T. Finkel and A.A. Quyyumi, Vox Sang. 87 Suppl 2 (2004) 31-37. [2]] [A.Y. Khakoo and T. Finkel, Annu. Rev. Med. 56 (2005) 79-101. [3]] [H.G. Kopp, C.A. Ramos and S. Rafii, Curr. Opin. Hematol. 13 (2006) 175-181. [4]; K.K. Hirschi, D.A. Ingram and M.C. Yoder, Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 28 (2008) 1584-1595. [5]; F. Timmermans, J. Plum, M.C. Yoder, D.A. Ingram, B. Vandekerckhove and J. Case, J. Cell. Mol. Med. 13 (2009) 87-102. [6]] and reviews by Bertolini, Voest and Yoder in this issue.

KW - Angiogenesis

KW - Bone marrow

KW - Bone marrow transaplantation

KW - Chemotherapy

KW - EPCs

KW - HSCs

KW - Metastasis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=68949164736&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=68949164736&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbcan.2009.05.001

DO - 10.1016/j.bbcan.2009.05.001

M3 - Article

VL - 1796

SP - 33

EP - 40

JO - Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer

T2 - Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer

JF - Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Reviews on Cancer

SN - 0304-419X

IS - 1

ER -

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ID: 3107689