Blink rate related to impulsiveness and task demands during performance of event-related potential tasks

Zhinjin Huang, Matthew S. Stanford, Ernest S. Barratt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Spontaneous eyeblinks have been indirectly related to central dopaminergic activity in both human and animal studies. This relationship provides a potentially new technique for studying the role of dopamine in defining personality traits and psychiatric disorders. The purposes of the present study were to determine: (1) if a relationship exists between impulsiveness and blink rate; (2) if blink rate varies with psychophysiological demands. Eyeblinks were recorded during the performance of an augmenting/reducing event related potential (ERP) task and during an oddball ERP paradigm designed to study P300 and late ERP components. The results indicate that eyeblink rate: (1) is significantly related to motor impulsiveness; (2) varies with task demands. There were no task-impulsiveness interactions. Although the bulk of recent research relating neural transmitters to impulsiveness emphasizes a causal role for low serotonin, the current results suggest that this may be an oversimplification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-648
Number of pages4
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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