Bacteroides ovatus colonization influences the abundance of intestinal short chain fatty acids and neurotransmitters

Thomas D. Horvath, Faith D. Ihekweazu, Sigmund J. Haidacher, Wenly Ruan, Kristen A. Engevik, Robert Fultz, Kathleen M. Hoch, Ruth Ann Luna, Numan Oezguen, Jennifer K. Spinler, Anthony M. Haag, James Versalovic, Melinda A. Engevik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gut microbes can synthesize multiple neuro-active metabolites. We profiled neuro-active compounds produced by the gut commensal Bacteroides ovatus in vitro and in vivo by LC-MS/MS. We found that B. ovatus generates acetic acid, propionic acid, isobutyric acid, and isovaleric acid. In vitro, B. ovatus consumed tryptophan and glutamate and synthesized the neuro-active compounds glutamine and GABA. Consistent with our LC-MS/MS-based in vitro data, we observed elevated levels of acetic acid, propionic acid, isobutyric acid, and isovaleric acid in the intestines of B. ovatus mono-associated mice compared with germ-free controls. B. ovatus mono-association also increased the concentrations of intestinal GABA and decreased the concentrations of tryptophan and glutamine compared with germ-free controls. Computational network analysis revealed unique links between SCFAs, neuro-active compounds, and colonization status. These results highlight connections between microbial colonization and intestinal neurotransmitter concentrations, suggesting that B. ovatus selectively influences the presence of intestinal neurotransmitters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number104158
JournaliScience
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 20 2022

Keywords

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiome
  • Neuroscience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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