Bacterial flora in irritable bowel syndrome: Role in pathophysiology, implications for management

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58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may, in part at least, result from a dysfunctional interaction between the indigenous flora and the intestinal mucosa which, in turn, leads to immune activation in the colonic mucosa. Some propose a role for bacterial overgrowth as a common causative factor in the pathogenesis of symptoms in IBS; other evidence points to more subtle qualitative changes in the colonic flora; both hypotheses remain to be confirmed but the likelihood that bacterial overgrowth will prove to be a major factor in IBS now seems remote. Nevertheless, short-term therapy with either antibiotics or probiotics does seem to reduce symptoms among IBS patients. It seems most likely that the benefits of antibiotic therapy are mediated through subtle and, perhaps, localized, quantitative and/or qualitative changes in the colonic flora. How probiotics exert their effects remain to be defined but an anti-inflammatory effect seems likely. While this approach to the management of IBS is in its infancy, it is evident that manipulation of the flora, whether through the administration of antibiotics or probiotics, deserves further attention in IBS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2-7
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Digestive Diseases
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Keywords

  • Antibiotic
  • Enteric flora
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Mucosal inflammation
  • Probiotic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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