Associations between aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aortic valve or coronary artery calcification: The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis and the heinz nixdorf recall study

Joseph A. Delaney, Nils Lehmann, Karl Heinz Jöckel, Sammy Elmariah, Bruce M. Psaty, Amir A. Mahabadi, Matt Budoff, Richard A. Kronmal, Khurram Nasir, Kevin D. O'Brien, Stefan Möhlenkamp, Susanne Moebus, Nico Dragano, Almut G. Winterstein, Raimund Erbel, Hagen Kälsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The association between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the incidence of valvular and arterial calcification is not well established despite known associations between these drugs and cardiovascular events. Objective: To compare the association between the baseline use of aspirin with other NSAID class medications with the incidence and prevalence of aortic valve calcification (AVC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC). Methods: The relationship of NSAID use to AVC and CAC detected by computed tomography was assessed in 6814 participants within the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) using regression modeling. Results were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, study site, anti-hypertensive medication use, education, income, health insurance status, diabetes, smoking, exercise, body mass index, blood pressure, serum lipids, inflammatory markers, fasting glucose, statin medication use, and a simple diet score. Medication use was assessed by medication inventory at baseline which includes the use of non-prescription NSAIDs. MESA collects information on both incident and prevalent calcification. The 4814 participants of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall (HNR) Study, a German prospective cohort study with similar measures of calcification, were included in this analysis to enable replication. Results: Mean age of the MESA participants was 62 years (51% female). After adjustment for possible confounding factors, a possible association between aspirin use and incident AVC (Relative Risk(RR): 1.60; 95%Confidence Interval (CI): 1.19-2.15) did not replicate in the HNR cohort (RR: 1.06; 95%CI: 0.87-1.28). There was no significant association between aspirin use and incident CAC in the MESA cohort (RR 1.08; 95%CI: 0.91-1.29) or in the HNR cohort (RR 1.24; 95%CI: 0.87-1.77). Non-aspirin NSAID use was not associated with either AVC or CAC in either cohort. There were no associations between regular cardiac dose aspirin and incident calcification in either cohort. Conclusion: Baseline NSAID use, as assessed by medication inventory, appears to have no protective effect regarding the onset of calcification in either coronary arteries or aortic valves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-316
Number of pages7
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume229
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Aortic valve calcification
  • Aspirin
  • Coronary artery calcification
  • Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study
  • Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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