Association between self-rated health and ideal cardiovascular health: The Baptist Health South Florida Employee Study

Oluseye Ogunmoroti, Ovie A. Utuama, Joseph A. Salami, Javier Valero-Elizondo, Erica S. Spatz, Maribeth Rouseff, Don Parris, Sankalp Das, Henry Guzman, Arthur Agatston, Theodore Feldman, Emir Veledar, Wasim Maziak, Khurram Nasir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: There is increasing evidence of the role psychosocial factors play as determinants of cardiovascular health (CVH). We examined the association between self-rated health (SRH) and ideal CVH among employees of a large healthcare organization. Methods: Data were collected in 2014 from employees of Baptist Health South Florida during an annual voluntary health risk assessment and wellness fair. SRH was measured using a self-administered questionnaire where responses ranged from poor, fair, good, very good to excellent. A CVH score (the proxy for CVH) that ranged from 0 to 14 was calculated, where 0-8 indicate an inadequate score, 9-10, average and 11-14, optimal. A multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the association between SRH and CVH. Results: Of the 9056 participants, 75% were female and mean age (SD) was 43 ± 12 years. The odds of having a higher CVH score increased as SRH improved. With participants who reported their health status as poor-fair serving as reference, adjusted odds ratios for having an optimal CVH score by the categories of SRH were: excellent, 21.04 (15.08-29.36); very good 10.04 (7.25-13.9); and good 3.63 (2.61-5.05). Conclusion: Favorable SRH was consistently associated with better CVH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e456-e463
JournalJournal of public health (Oxford, England)
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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