Anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement prevalence in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer in the United States: Retrospective real world data

Timothy Craig Allen, Yan Xiao, Baiyu Yang, Denise Croix, Anup Abraham, Stella Redpath, Julia Engstrom-Melynk, Roma Shah, Jaya Madala, Eric H. Bernicker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study assessed the prevalence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements in US oncology practices. Materials and Methods: Using a nationwide real-world database, we included adults with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (aNSCLC, stage IIIB- IV) diagnosed January 2015 - May 2019, with documented ALK testing results and smoking status. Rearrangement prevalence was assessed overall and then stratified by patient characteristics. Results: The cohort included 19,895 eligible patients with a mean age 68.5 years, majority ever-smokers (85.5%) and from community centers (92.2%). The overall ALK rearrangement prevalence was 2.6%. Positivity rate varied by histology and smoking status; it was the highest among non-smoking patients with non-squamous histology (9.3%). Differences in ALK status also varied by age and race, with young patients (18-39 years) having a higher prevalence (21.6%) vs. older patients (age ≥55 = 2.2%); Asian patients had a prevalence of 6.3%. Patients that were positive for other mutations or rearrangements had a lower ALK positivity rate (0.5%) and patients positive for PD-L1 had a rate of 3.0%. Conclusions: The likelihood of finding an ALK translocation was highest in younger patients and nonsmokers; however, age and smoking history were not discriminative enough to exclude testing based on clinical variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2308-2315
Number of pages8
JournalOncotarget
Volume12
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 9 2021

Keywords

  • ALK rearrangement
  • NSCLC
  • Prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement prevalence in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer in the United States: Retrospective real world data'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this