Analysis of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in human lung tissue, pulmonary macrophages, and blood lymphocytes

Theodore L. McLemore, R. Russell Martin, Robert R. Springer, Nelda Wray, Kenneth L. Toppell, Laurens R. Pickard, Kenneth L. Mattox, Gene A. Guinn, Elroy T. Cantrell, David L. Busbee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity was measured fluorometrically in surgically-excised fresh lung tissue, pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs), and peripheral blood lymphocytes from 14 cigarette smokers (7 with and 7 without primary lung cancer). Levels of AHH in fresh PAMs and AHH inducibility (expressed as fold-induction) in cultured, mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes from individual noncancer patients correlated well (r = 0.975, p < .001). For individual lung cancer patients, however, these values were dissociated (linear regression not appropriate for this set of values). Levels of AHH in fresh lung tissue and fold-induction ratios in cultured lymphocytes from individual noncancer patients also exhibited a positive correlation (r = 0.976, p < .001), while values for individual lung cancer patients did not (r = 0.007, p = 0.987). A close agreement was noted for AHH in fresh lung tissue and fresh PAMs from individual noncancer patients (r = 0.984, p < .001), while these values are weakly correlated for lung cancer patients (r = 0.658, p < .11). When AHH activity in fresh PAMs, in fresh lung tissue, and AHH inducibility in cultured lymphocytes were simultaneously compared, an excellent relationship was observed for values for all 3 tissues for individual noncancer patients (r = 0.987, p < .001). However, AHH levels in these 3 tissues from individual lung cancer patients were not correlated (r = 0.701, p > .25). These results indicate similar capacity for AHH induction is present in fresh lung tissue, fresh PAMs, and cultured mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes from cigarette smokers without evidence of lung cancer, but AHH values are not positively correlated with similar tissues from individual lung cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2292-2300
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1978

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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