Acceptability of interferon-gamma release assays among healthcare workers who receive routine employee tuberculosis testing

Yael Hirsch-Moverman, Kirsten Wall, Paul Weinfurter, Elizabeth Munk, Joyce Ann Moran, Allison Maiuris, Amera Khan, Nichlas DeLuca, TB Epidemiologic Studies Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) undergo annual testing for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI).

OBJECTIVE: Compare acceptability of tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) among HCWs.

METHODS: HCWs at four medical centers in the US were administered an acceptability questionnaire including a brief objective description of both tests and eliciting attitudes regarding TST and IGRAs, confidence in results, and likelihood of taking LTBI treatment.

RESULTS: Of 406 participants, 75% had never heard of IGRAs. IGRAs were preferred to TST. Belief in accuracy of hypothetical positive results of TST or IGRA and willingness to accept LTBI treatment were similar across tests. When presented with hypothetical discordant results, HCWs expressed more confidence in IGRAs. Perceived accuracy of results was the most important factor in test preferences.

CONCLUSIONS: Although HCWs preferred and indicated more confidence in IGRAs, the likelihood that HCWs would believe LTBI diagnosis and initiate treatment based on positive results was similar for TST and IGRAs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-24
Number of pages6
JournalInternational journal of occupational and environmental health
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Attitude of Health Personnel
  • Female
  • Health Personnel
  • Humans
  • Interferon-gamma Release Tests
  • Latent Tuberculosis
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Patient Preference
  • Sensitivity and Specificity
  • Tuberculin Test
  • United States

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