A trial of 2 strategies to reduce nocturnal blood pressure in blacks with chronic kidney disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mahboob Rahman, Tom Greene, Robert A. Phillips, Lawrence Y. Agodoa, George L. Bakris, Jeanne Charleston, Gabriel Contreras, Francis Gabbai, Leena Hiremath, Kenneth Jamerson, Cynthia Kendrick, John W. Kusek, James P. Lash, Janice Lea, Edgar R. Miller, Stephen Rostand, Robert Toto, Xulei Wang, Jackson T. Wright, Lawrence J. Appel

The objective of our study was to determine the effects of 2 antihypertensive drug dose schedules (PM dose and add-on dose) on nocturnal blood pressure (BP) in comparison with usual therapy (AM dose) in blacks with hypertensive chronic kidney disease and controlled office BP. In a 3-period, crossover trial, former participants of the African American Study of Kidney Disease were assigned to receive the following 3 regimens, each lasting 6 weeks, presented in random order: AM dose (once-daily antihypertensive medications taken in the morning), PM dose (once-daily antihypertensives taken at bedtime), and add-on dose (once-daily antihypertensives taken in the morning and an additional antihypertensive medication before bedtime [diltiazem 60-120 mg, hydralazine 25 mg, or additional ramipril 5 mg]). Ambulatory BP monitoring was performed at the end of each period. The primary outcome was nocturnal systolic BP. Mean age of the study population (n=147) was 65.4 years, 64% were men, and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 44.9 mL/min per 1.73 m. At the end of each period, mean (SE) nocturnal systolic BP was 125.6 (1.2) mm Hg in the AM dose, 123.9 (1.2) mm Hg in the PM dose, and 123.5 (1.2) mm Hg in the add-on dose. None of the pairwise differences in nocturnal, 24-hour, and daytime systolic BP was statistically significant. Among blacks with hypertensive chronic kidney disease, neither PM (bedtime) dosing of once-daily antihypertensive nor the addition of drugs taken at bedtime significantly reduced nocturnal BP compared with morning dosing of antihypertensive medications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-88
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

PMID: 23172931

PMCID: PMC3523681

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A trial of 2 strategies to reduce nocturnal blood pressure in blacks with chronic kidney disease. / Rahman, Mahboob; Greene, Tom; Phillips, Robert A.; Agodoa, Lawrence Y.; Bakris, George L.; Charleston, Jeanne; Contreras, Gabriel; Gabbai, Francis; Hiremath, Leena; Jamerson, Kenneth; Kendrick, Cynthia; Kusek, John W.; Lash, James P.; Lea, Janice; Miller, Edgar R.; Rostand, Stephen; Toto, Robert; Wang, Xulei; Wright, Jackson T.; Appel, Lawrence J.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 61, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 82-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Rahman, M, Greene, T, Phillips, RA, Agodoa, LY, Bakris, GL, Charleston, J, Contreras, G, Gabbai, F, Hiremath, L, Jamerson, K, Kendrick, C, Kusek, JW, Lash, JP, Lea, J, Miller, ER, Rostand, S, Toto, R, Wang, X, Wright, JT & Appel, LJ 2013, 'A trial of 2 strategies to reduce nocturnal blood pressure in blacks with chronic kidney disease' Hypertension, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 82-88. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.112.200477

APA

Rahman, M., Greene, T., Phillips, R. A., Agodoa, L. Y., Bakris, G. L., Charleston, J., ... Appel, L. J. (2013). A trial of 2 strategies to reduce nocturnal blood pressure in blacks with chronic kidney disease. Hypertension, 61(1), 82-88. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.112.200477

Vancouver

Rahman M, Greene T, Phillips RA, Agodoa LY, Bakris GL, Charleston J et al. A trial of 2 strategies to reduce nocturnal blood pressure in blacks with chronic kidney disease. Hypertension. 2013 Jan 1;61(1):82-88. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.112.200477

Author

Rahman, Mahboob ; Greene, Tom ; Phillips, Robert A. ; Agodoa, Lawrence Y. ; Bakris, George L. ; Charleston, Jeanne ; Contreras, Gabriel ; Gabbai, Francis ; Hiremath, Leena ; Jamerson, Kenneth ; Kendrick, Cynthia ; Kusek, John W. ; Lash, James P. ; Lea, Janice ; Miller, Edgar R. ; Rostand, Stephen ; Toto, Robert ; Wang, Xulei ; Wright, Jackson T. ; Appel, Lawrence J. / A trial of 2 strategies to reduce nocturnal blood pressure in blacks with chronic kidney disease. In: Hypertension. 2013 ; Vol. 61, No. 1. pp. 82-88.

BibTeX

@article{95bb061e9d664ad5af28657c213813a4,
title = "A trial of 2 strategies to reduce nocturnal blood pressure in blacks with chronic kidney disease",
abstract = "The objective of our study was to determine the effects of 2 antihypertensive drug dose schedules (PM dose and add-on dose) on nocturnal blood pressure (BP) in comparison with usual therapy (AM dose) in blacks with hypertensive chronic kidney disease and controlled office BP. In a 3-period, crossover trial, former participants of the African American Study of Kidney Disease were assigned to receive the following 3 regimens, each lasting 6 weeks, presented in random order: AM dose (once-daily antihypertensive medications taken in the morning), PM dose (once-daily antihypertensives taken at bedtime), and add-on dose (once-daily antihypertensives taken in the morning and an additional antihypertensive medication before bedtime [diltiazem 60-120 mg, hydralazine 25 mg, or additional ramipril 5 mg]). Ambulatory BP monitoring was performed at the end of each period. The primary outcome was nocturnal systolic BP. Mean age of the study population (n=147) was 65.4 years, 64{\%} were men, and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 44.9 mL/min per 1.73 m. At the end of each period, mean (SE) nocturnal systolic BP was 125.6 (1.2) mm Hg in the AM dose, 123.9 (1.2) mm Hg in the PM dose, and 123.5 (1.2) mm Hg in the add-on dose. None of the pairwise differences in nocturnal, 24-hour, and daytime systolic BP was statistically significant. Among blacks with hypertensive chronic kidney disease, neither PM (bedtime) dosing of once-daily antihypertensive nor the addition of drugs taken at bedtime significantly reduced nocturnal BP compared with morning dosing of antihypertensive medications.",
keywords = "chronic kidney disease, hypertension, nocturnal blood pressure",
author = "Mahboob Rahman and Tom Greene and Phillips, {Robert A.} and Agodoa, {Lawrence Y.} and Bakris, {George L.} and Jeanne Charleston and Gabriel Contreras and Francis Gabbai and Leena Hiremath and Kenneth Jamerson and Cynthia Kendrick and Kusek, {John W.} and Lash, {James P.} and Janice Lea and Miller, {Edgar R.} and Stephen Rostand and Robert Toto and Xulei Wang and Wright, {Jackson T.} and Appel, {Lawrence J.}",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.112.200477",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "61",
pages = "82--88",
journal = "Hypertension",
issn = "0194-911X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A trial of 2 strategies to reduce nocturnal blood pressure in blacks with chronic kidney disease

AU - Rahman, Mahboob

AU - Greene, Tom

AU - Phillips, Robert A.

AU - Agodoa, Lawrence Y.

AU - Bakris, George L.

AU - Charleston, Jeanne

AU - Contreras, Gabriel

AU - Gabbai, Francis

AU - Hiremath, Leena

AU - Jamerson, Kenneth

AU - Kendrick, Cynthia

AU - Kusek, John W.

AU - Lash, James P.

AU - Lea, Janice

AU - Miller, Edgar R.

AU - Rostand, Stephen

AU - Toto, Robert

AU - Wang, Xulei

AU - Wright, Jackson T.

AU - Appel, Lawrence J.

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - The objective of our study was to determine the effects of 2 antihypertensive drug dose schedules (PM dose and add-on dose) on nocturnal blood pressure (BP) in comparison with usual therapy (AM dose) in blacks with hypertensive chronic kidney disease and controlled office BP. In a 3-period, crossover trial, former participants of the African American Study of Kidney Disease were assigned to receive the following 3 regimens, each lasting 6 weeks, presented in random order: AM dose (once-daily antihypertensive medications taken in the morning), PM dose (once-daily antihypertensives taken at bedtime), and add-on dose (once-daily antihypertensives taken in the morning and an additional antihypertensive medication before bedtime [diltiazem 60-120 mg, hydralazine 25 mg, or additional ramipril 5 mg]). Ambulatory BP monitoring was performed at the end of each period. The primary outcome was nocturnal systolic BP. Mean age of the study population (n=147) was 65.4 years, 64% were men, and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 44.9 mL/min per 1.73 m. At the end of each period, mean (SE) nocturnal systolic BP was 125.6 (1.2) mm Hg in the AM dose, 123.9 (1.2) mm Hg in the PM dose, and 123.5 (1.2) mm Hg in the add-on dose. None of the pairwise differences in nocturnal, 24-hour, and daytime systolic BP was statistically significant. Among blacks with hypertensive chronic kidney disease, neither PM (bedtime) dosing of once-daily antihypertensive nor the addition of drugs taken at bedtime significantly reduced nocturnal BP compared with morning dosing of antihypertensive medications.

AB - The objective of our study was to determine the effects of 2 antihypertensive drug dose schedules (PM dose and add-on dose) on nocturnal blood pressure (BP) in comparison with usual therapy (AM dose) in blacks with hypertensive chronic kidney disease and controlled office BP. In a 3-period, crossover trial, former participants of the African American Study of Kidney Disease were assigned to receive the following 3 regimens, each lasting 6 weeks, presented in random order: AM dose (once-daily antihypertensive medications taken in the morning), PM dose (once-daily antihypertensives taken at bedtime), and add-on dose (once-daily antihypertensives taken in the morning and an additional antihypertensive medication before bedtime [diltiazem 60-120 mg, hydralazine 25 mg, or additional ramipril 5 mg]). Ambulatory BP monitoring was performed at the end of each period. The primary outcome was nocturnal systolic BP. Mean age of the study population (n=147) was 65.4 years, 64% were men, and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 44.9 mL/min per 1.73 m. At the end of each period, mean (SE) nocturnal systolic BP was 125.6 (1.2) mm Hg in the AM dose, 123.9 (1.2) mm Hg in the PM dose, and 123.5 (1.2) mm Hg in the add-on dose. None of the pairwise differences in nocturnal, 24-hour, and daytime systolic BP was statistically significant. Among blacks with hypertensive chronic kidney disease, neither PM (bedtime) dosing of once-daily antihypertensive nor the addition of drugs taken at bedtime significantly reduced nocturnal BP compared with morning dosing of antihypertensive medications.

KW - chronic kidney disease

KW - hypertension

KW - nocturnal blood pressure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84871617630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84871617630&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.112.200477

DO - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.112.200477

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 82

EP - 88

JO - Hypertension

T2 - Hypertension

JF - Hypertension

SN - 0194-911X

IS - 1

ER -

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