A second-generation blood substitute (perfluorodichlorooctane emulsion) does not activate complement during an ex vivo circulation model of bypass

John D. Rosoff, Louise O. Soltow, Craig R. Vocelka, Gottfried Schmer, Wayne Chandler, R. Pat Cochran, Karyn S. Kunzelman, Bruce D. Spiess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To examine whether a second-generation perfluorocarbon (PFC) blood substitute added to the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) prime influences complement production. Design: A prospective, randomized, single-blinded, ex vivo model. Setting: A university hospital, laboratory, and clinics. Participants: Ten healthy adult consented volunteer blood donors (five men, five women). Interventions: Ex vivo closed-loop extracorporeal circuit including membrane oxygenator, tubing, and filter primed with crystalloid or crystalloid plus PFC was circulated for 1 hour with the addition of 500 mL of heparinized fresh human whole blood. Measurements and Main Results: Laboratory specimens were drawn from the circuit at 10-minute intervals for 1 hour and measured for complement (C3a, Bb fragment) concentrations, blood gases, fibrinogen concentration, platelet count, and hematocrit. In the PFC group, C3a and Bb fragments were equal to or less than those in the group that received crystalloid alone. Conclusion: The second-generation PFC added to the prime of a CPB circuit does not independently increase complement production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-401
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Keywords

  • Bb fragment
  • Blood substitute
  • C3a
  • Cardiopulmonary/extracorporeal bypass
  • Complement activation
  • Perfluorocarbon
  • Perfluorodichlorooctane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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