A pilot survey of ventilated cancer patients' perspectives and recollections of early mobility in the intensive care unit

Steven H Hsu, Claudine Campbell, Amanda K Weeks, Maryann Herklotz, Natalie Kostelecky, Stephen M Pastores, Neil A Halpern, Louis P Voigt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the level of recall, satisfaction, and perceived benefits of early mobility (EM) among ventilated cancer patients after extubation in the intensive care unit (ICU).

METHODS: A survey of patients' perceptions and recollections of EM was administered within 72 h of extubation. Data on recall of EM participation, activities achieved, adequacy of staffing and rest periods, strength to participate, activity level of difficulty, satisfaction with staff instructions, breathing management, and overall rating of the experience were analyzed. The Confusion Assessment Method for ICU (CAM-ICU) was used for delirium screening.

RESULTS: Fifty-four patients comprised the study group. Nearly 90% reported satisfaction with instructions, staffing, rest periods, and breathing management during EM. Participants indicated that EM maintained their strength (67%) and gave them control over their recovery (61%); a minority felt optimistic (37%) and safe (22%). Patients who achieved more sessions and "out-of-bed" exercises had better recall of actual activities compared with those who exercised in bed. Overall, patients with CAM-ICU-positive results (33%) performed less physical and occupational therapy exercises.

CONCLUSIONS: Ventilated cancer patients reported an overall positive EM experience, but factual memory impairment of EM activities was common. These findings highlight the needs and the importance of shaping strategies to deliver a more patient focused EM experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - May 29 2019

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