A comparison of immediate and delayed vitrectomy for the management of vitreous hemorrhage due to proliferative diabetic retinopathy

Janelle M. Fassbender, Ahmet Ozkok, Hannah Canter, Shlomit Schaal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To compare immediate and delayed vitrectomy for the management of vitreous hemorrhage (VH) due to proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of 134 eyes receiving vitrectomy for non-clearing, PDR-associated VH. Primary outcome was area under the vision curve (AUC) in patients receiving immediate (< 30 days) versus delayed (> 30 days) vitrectomy with endolaser. RESULTS: Forty-six eyes were included, with 17 undergoing immediate (< 30 days) vitrectomy with endolaser and 29 undergoing delayed (> 30 days) vitrectomy with endolaser. Time to vitrectomy was 14.8 days ± 8.26 days compared to 629.6 days ± 894.9 days in the immediate and delayed groups, respectively. AUC was significantly greater for patients undergoing delayed versus immediate vitrectomy (276.1 ± 0.601 logMAR time versus 165.7 ± 0.761 logMAR time; P <.0001). There was no difference in AUC postoperatively for delayed versus immediate surgery. Both groups required significantly less postoperative panretinal photocoagulation (P <.05). Preoperative and final visual acuities were equivalent (immediate: 1.86 ± 0.99 and 0.35 ± 0.25; P =.002; delayed: 1.71 ± 1.05 and 0.31 ± 0.34; P <.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Immediate vitrectomy with endolaser for PDR-associated VH (< 30 days) decreases time spent with vision loss and the need for adjunctive PRP. Modern vitrectomy is safe and may be considered earlier in VH management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-41
Number of pages7
JournalOphthalmic Surgery Lasers and Imaging Retina
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Ophthalmology

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