5′ dinucleotide repeat polymorphism of NRAMP1 and susceptibility to tuberculosis among Caucasian patients in Houston, Texas

X. Ma, S. Dou, J. A. Wright, R. A. Reich, L. D. Teeter, H. M. El Sahly, R. J. Awe, J. M. Musser, E. A. Graviss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

SETTING: Houston Tuberculosis Initiative (HTI) and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. OBJECTIVE: To further explore the association between the polymorphisms of NRAMP1 and human susceptibility/resistance to tuberculosis (TB), specifically to determine whether the reported association shown for blacks and Asians holds true for Caucasian populations. DESIGN: In a case-control study, 135 adult Caucasian TB patients and 108 adult Caucasian HIV-seronegative non-TB controls were analyzed for the association between the polymorphisms in NRAMP1 gene and clinical TB. RESULTS: Heterozygote at 5′(GT)n, a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the promoter of NRAMP1, was observed at significantly higher frequencies among HIV-negative patients with pulmonary TB (41.6%; OR 2.02; 95%CI 1.11-3.64), extra-pulmonary TB (66.7%; OR 4.80; 95%CI 1.34-17.15), and HIV-seropositive TB patients (50%; OR 3.77; 95%CI 1.33-10.66) in comparison with the controls (27.8%). Homozygotes (GT)10,10 were over-represented among HIV-positive TB patients (18.2%; OR 6.86; 95%CI 1.55-30.21) compared to the controls (5.5%). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the 5′(GT)n polymorphism of NRAMP1 modifies TB susceptibility in this Caucasian population, and could possibly be related to the site of infection among HIV-negative individuals and HIV-coinfected TB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)818-823
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Volume6
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Keywords

  • NRAMP1
  • Polymorphism
  • Susceptibility
  • Tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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